5 Small Music Venues that Seriously Rock

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5 Small Venues

Toad’s Place – 300 York Street, New Haven, CT

Why Toad’s Place Rocks: Originally, the Yale Co-op stood where Toad’s now resides. It was various restaurants after Yale sold it off, and former culinary student Michael Spoerndle purchased the building to turn it into a French and Italian restaurant in 1975. But by 1976, Toad’s Place (that was also the name of the restaurant, btw), Spoerndle transformed Toad’s into a live music venue with the help of local musician Peter Menta, as well as friend and co-owner Brian Phelps. Right off the bat, acts like Willie Dixon, Muddy Waters, and John Lee Hooker graced the stage at the 750 capacity club. Billy Joel recorded “Los Angelenos” from his album Songs in the Attic at Toad’s in 1980, and U2 played there three times at the dawn of the ‘80s while they promoted Boy and during their October Tour. They also premiered the song Fire there, and Adam Clayton can be seen in a Toad’s tee shirt in early promo photos of U2. In 1990, Bob Dylan played a set that lasted more than five hours, and was his first club appearance in a quarter century. More recent acts have included Mackelmore & Ryan Lewis, Juicy J, Interpol, and Wiz Khalifa.


Rolling Stones

Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Charlie Watts and Ronnie Wood, better known as The Rolling Stones, have kicked off their Zip Code Tour, which began on May 24 at Petco Park in San Diego, California.

The 15-stop tour is scheduled to end July 15, with all shows taking place in North America. The price of Rolling Stones tickets varies from city to city, below are some of the most expensive and least expensive shows of the tour based on our sales numbers.

The first show at the aforementioned Petco Park was the most expensive tour stop on the secondary market, so it can only get better for fans wanting to see them in concert from here on out. Petco Park had an average ticket price of $563.94 with a get-in price of $175. This is the only show of the tour thus far (as of 5/27) that had an average ticket price over $400. From California to Milwaukee, the band’s June 23 show at the Marcus Amphitheater is the second-most expensive with an average ticket price of $393.42 and a get-in price of $122. To round out the top-three, the July 1 concert in Raleigh, North Carolina at Carter-Finley Stadium is the third-most expensive tour stop, averaging $382.07 for tickets, with a get-in price of $115.

On the opposite end of the spectrum, the July 4 show at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indiana is the least expensive show. The average ticket price is $204.06, with a get-in price of $60. There are two other shows that have average ticket prices under $210, that being the June 3 show at TCF Bank Stadium in Minnesota ($207.84, get-in $96) and the June 27 show at Arrowhead Stadium in Kansas City, with special guest Ed Sheeran ($208.72, get-in $53).

The set list includes classic songs such as, “It’s Only Rock ‘n’ Roll (But I Like it),” “Honky Tonk Women,” “Midnight Rambler,” “Gimme Shelter,” “Sympathy for the Devil,” “You Can’t Always Get What You Want,” “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” and more.

Inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1989, the band’s 29 studio albums, 18 live albums and compilations have garnered fans from all over the world for over 50 years.

Research by Michael Merritt

Guess Who

Image from SWNS.com via The Dail Mail

With every new date for a top event, whether Kanye or Britney, Wicked or West Ham, fans with less-than-bottomless pockets sometimes cringe. It’s extremely rare to hear a true music lover ever state that they regret digging deep for those nosebleeds to see their longtime favorite musician, but before they make the commitment, many will lament the cost. For Rolling Stones fans, high ticket prices are part and parcel with their fandom.

A quote from Rolling Stone highlights fans’ displeasure:

"Can the Rolling Stones actually need all that money… How much can the Stones take back to Merrie England after taxes, anyway? How much must the British manager and the American manager and the agency rake off the top?...  [It] says a very bad thing to me about the artists' attitude towards the public. It says they despise their own audience."

And that quote was published in the November 15, 1969 issue of Rolling Stone Magazine. You can read the whole piece here, it’s definitely worth a peruse.  As per the date of original publication, concertgoers were being asked to fork over $8.50 tops for tickets to the Stones’ tour supporting their album Let It Bleed. At the time, other top acts like The Doors had ticket prices topping out at $6.50. Today, that would get you a venti frappucino and a dirty look from the barista because you’d have nothing left for the tip.


Top Rolling Stones Song from Every Decade

Rolling Stones


Fifty-three years is a long time to stick with anything - or anyone - and with the launch of their 2015 ZIP CODE Tour, The Rolling Stones show no signs of letting up. The tour, scheduled to support the remastered edition of 1971's killer Sticky Fingers, will see the band playing stadiums across the U.S. So in honor of Mick, Keith, Charlie, and Ronnie hitting the road again this summer and fall, we're looking back at the best Stones songs through the decades.

1960s - "Sympathy for the Devil" (1968) from the album Beggar's Banquet

Sure, they came on the scene with much more family-friendly fare in 1962, but the Rolling Stones quickly separated themselves from that other group from across the pond as the "bad boys" of British rock. "Sympathy for the Devil" perfectly captures just how much they embraced their reputation while staying true to their blues-inflected rock roots. Iconic not only for its musicality but its subject matter, the song had folks clutching their pearls across the globe. After already causing a stir with earlier sexually "explicit" (for the day) tunes like "Let's Spend the Night Together" and rumored Satanism in the group, "Sympathy for the Devil" was a bit of Mick thumbing his nose at critics. Allegedly, the tune was also inspired by the works of Baudelaire, which underscores just how bright the members of the Stones really are - Jagger was a student of business at the famed London School of Economics until that whole music thing really took off.


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After months of rumors and speculation, The Rolling Stones have FINALLY confirmed they will be going on tour in the United States this summer. Yesterday, the British rock band announced they will embark on the “ZIP Code” tour, which will take them to 15 cities across North America. Beginning on May 24 in San Diego, the tour will make stops at some of the country’s largest venues, including Heinz Field in Pittsburgh, AT&T Stadium in Dallas, and the Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

According to the Rolling Stones' website, the band will be able to directly interact with their fans thanks to a stage that will extend into the audience. They will also be using “cutting-edge” technology, including the use of video screens and special effects to better enhance the experience for concertgoers.

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